Forest Smoke, Tsiribihina River, Madagascar, 2016   Artist Statement   “The death of the forest is the end of our life.” Dorothy Stang  What Remains , is a self-initiated project born out of Al Obaidly’s journey across the island of Madagascar in 2016. Traveling from the capital Antananarivo to the west coast and ending her trip in Belo Sur Mer, Al Obaidly covered over 800km by land, river and sea.  Madagascar is an exceptional terrestrial ecoregion home to unique species of plants and animal life found nowhere else on Earth, yet it is also the world’s leader in deforestation, with approximately 93% of its primary forests destroyed, leaving only 7% of the island’s rich rainforest left. The reason for this slash-and-burn agriculture – whereby an area of forest is cut and burned – is to create fields for raising cattle, logging of precious woods, charcoal production and in certain sites for mining purposes. All destroy the island’s habitats, rich with endemic biodiversity.  This body of work combines photographic works, sound design, a film installation and sculpture. What Remains is an exploration of what mankind will leave behind once we have fully exploited Earth’s natural resources in the name of progress. The work asks profound questions about human civilization’s impact on our environment. Al Obaidly hopes to initiate dialog with a serious message and a call to action, encouraging visitors to self-reflect, spurring all of us to contemplate and re-evaluate our relationships with and connection to the natural environment in this modern world, and the footprint we will leave behind.
       
     
 Tavy (slash-and-burn) I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 New Mountain, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Last Tree Standing, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Birds of Prey I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Birds of Prey II, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Charcoal, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Tavy (slash-and-burn) II, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Fire Starter, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Renala (Mother of the Forest), Tsiribihina River, 2016  “Every forest branch moves differently in the breeze, but as they sway they connect at the roots” - Rumi   The baobab, also called “renala”(“mother of the forest”) in Malagasy is a majestic and sacred tree that counts eight species, six of them endemic to Madagascar. The national tree of Madagascar, most 18-meter high baobab trees are more than 800 years old, with the larger trees aging between 1,100 and 2,500 years old. They can grow to 6,000+ years. Their hollow trunks contain an important reserve of water, which allows them to tolerate extreme climatic conditions. With this high-water content, they do not perish in the forest fires. However, because their one-of-a-kind ecosystem is being disturbed around them, these ancient trees are now dying at an increasing rate.
       
     
 Empty River, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Birds over Smoking Field, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Boy in Field, near Allee des Baobabs, Menabe Region, 2016
       
     
 Paddy Fields I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Terraced Paddy Fields I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Roots of the Sky, Menabe Region, 2016
       
     
 Waiting Game, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Paddy Fields II, Antananarivo, Madagascar, 2016
       
     
 Forest Smoke, Tsiribihina River, Madagascar, 2016   Artist Statement   “The death of the forest is the end of our life.” Dorothy Stang  What Remains , is a self-initiated project born out of Al Obaidly’s journey across the island of Madagascar in 2016. Traveling from the capital Antananarivo to the west coast and ending her trip in Belo Sur Mer, Al Obaidly covered over 800km by land, river and sea.  Madagascar is an exceptional terrestrial ecoregion home to unique species of plants and animal life found nowhere else on Earth, yet it is also the world’s leader in deforestation, with approximately 93% of its primary forests destroyed, leaving only 7% of the island’s rich rainforest left. The reason for this slash-and-burn agriculture – whereby an area of forest is cut and burned – is to create fields for raising cattle, logging of precious woods, charcoal production and in certain sites for mining purposes. All destroy the island’s habitats, rich with endemic biodiversity.  This body of work combines photographic works, sound design, a film installation and sculpture. What Remains is an exploration of what mankind will leave behind once we have fully exploited Earth’s natural resources in the name of progress. The work asks profound questions about human civilization’s impact on our environment. Al Obaidly hopes to initiate dialog with a serious message and a call to action, encouraging visitors to self-reflect, spurring all of us to contemplate and re-evaluate our relationships with and connection to the natural environment in this modern world, and the footprint we will leave behind.
       
     

Forest Smoke, Tsiribihina River, Madagascar, 2016

Artist Statement

“The death of the forest is the end of our life.” Dorothy Stang

What Remains , is a self-initiated project born out of Al Obaidly’s journey across the island of Madagascar in 2016. Traveling from the capital Antananarivo to the west coast and ending her trip in Belo Sur Mer, Al Obaidly covered over 800km by land, river and sea.

Madagascar is an exceptional terrestrial ecoregion home to unique species of plants and animal life found nowhere else on Earth, yet it is also the world’s leader in deforestation, with approximately 93% of its primary forests destroyed, leaving only 7% of the island’s rich rainforest left. The reason for this slash-and-burn agriculture – whereby an area of forest is cut and burned – is to create fields for raising cattle, logging of precious woods, charcoal production and in certain sites for mining purposes. All destroy the island’s habitats, rich with endemic biodiversity.

This body of work combines photographic works, sound design, a film installation and sculpture. What Remains is an exploration of what mankind will leave behind once we have fully exploited Earth’s natural resources in the name of progress. The work asks profound questions about human civilization’s impact on our environment. Al Obaidly hopes to initiate dialog with a serious message and a call to action, encouraging visitors to self-reflect, spurring all of us to contemplate and re-evaluate our relationships with and connection to the natural environment in this modern world, and the footprint we will leave behind.

 Tavy (slash-and-burn) I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Tavy (slash-and-burn) I, Madagascar, 2016

 New Mountain, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

New Mountain, Madagascar, 2016

 Last Tree Standing, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Last Tree Standing, Madagascar, 2016

 Birds of Prey I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Birds of Prey I, Madagascar, 2016

 Birds of Prey II, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Birds of Prey II, Madagascar, 2016

 Charcoal, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Charcoal, Madagascar, 2016

 Tavy (slash-and-burn) II, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Tavy (slash-and-burn) II, Madagascar, 2016

 Fire Starter, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Fire Starter, Madagascar, 2016

 Renala (Mother of the Forest), Tsiribihina River, 2016  “Every forest branch moves differently in the breeze, but as they sway they connect at the roots” - Rumi   The baobab, also called “renala”(“mother of the forest”) in Malagasy is a majestic and sacred tree that counts eight species, six of them endemic to Madagascar. The national tree of Madagascar, most 18-meter high baobab trees are more than 800 years old, with the larger trees aging between 1,100 and 2,500 years old. They can grow to 6,000+ years. Their hollow trunks contain an important reserve of water, which allows them to tolerate extreme climatic conditions. With this high-water content, they do not perish in the forest fires. However, because their one-of-a-kind ecosystem is being disturbed around them, these ancient trees are now dying at an increasing rate.
       
     

Renala (Mother of the Forest), Tsiribihina River, 2016

“Every forest branch moves differently in the breeze, but as they sway they connect at the roots” - Rumi

The baobab, also called “renala”(“mother of the forest”) in Malagasy is a majestic and sacred tree that counts eight species, six of them endemic to Madagascar. The national tree of Madagascar, most 18-meter high baobab trees are more than 800 years old, with the larger trees aging between 1,100 and 2,500 years old. They can grow to 6,000+ years. Their hollow trunks contain an important reserve of water, which allows them to tolerate extreme climatic conditions. With this high-water content, they do not perish in the forest fires. However, because their one-of-a-kind ecosystem is being disturbed around them, these ancient trees are now dying at an increasing rate.

 Empty River, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Empty River, Madagascar, 2016

 Birds over Smoking Field, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Birds over Smoking Field, Madagascar, 2016

 Boy in Field, near Allee des Baobabs, Menabe Region, 2016
       
     

Boy in Field, near Allee des Baobabs, Menabe Region, 2016

 Paddy Fields I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Paddy Fields I, Madagascar, 2016

 Terraced Paddy Fields I, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Terraced Paddy Fields I, Madagascar, 2016

 Roots of the Sky, Menabe Region, 2016
       
     

Roots of the Sky, Menabe Region, 2016

 Waiting Game, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Waiting Game, Madagascar, 2016

 Paddy Fields II, Antananarivo, Madagascar, 2016
       
     

Paddy Fields II, Antananarivo, Madagascar, 2016